Three Savvy Ways to Build Your Yoga Business

Three Savvy Ways to Build Your Yoga Business…

Up until a few days ago, I didn’t think of myself as having a yoga business. But, low and behold, I sure can! Yoga is my favorite thing to do. Apparently, I’m good at it, so why not do more and make it better?

three savvy ways

After meeting with one of my mentors to pick her brain about some yoga business ideas, I came away with much more than I expected. There are licenses, insurance, marketing, networking, taxes, blah, blah, blah. I knew all that from my attorney and have most of that taken care of. What I didn’t know are the three areas from which a yoga instructor can gain the most success and profit.

And apparently, these are important because my mentor repeated this list more than once:

1.) Private and Semi-Private Lessons – This one I can do. This is 1:1 or 1:2 instruction with students who want to improve their practice, have limitations and need modification ideas, or are beginners and want to learn the basics before braving a group class. Really cool stuff.

three savvy ways

 

2.) Workshops – This one I can do too. There are certain subject areas that always make their way into my classes: Chakra Balancing, Prop Use, Modified Postures, Breathing Techniques, Mudras, and Meditation. Doing occasional workshops and diving deeper into these areas would be fabulous!

three savvy ways

3.) Training – Not ready for this one, but I will be. Thinking about Reiki, Eden Energy Medicine, and maybe, just maybe…Kids Yoga.

three savvy ways

So, stay tuned for information on this site about my new yoga offerings. And thank you for your support thus far. After all, a yoga instructor can’t survive without her students. Namaste.

How I Bring Yoga Into My Direct Sale Business

How I Bring Yoga Into My Direct Sale Business…

Yoga is one of my favorite things to do. It makes me feel calm, content, and accomplished. When children are learning, it makes sense that feeling those same three things would only help to make them successful. That’s why I have chosen to focus my efforts as Fundanoodle Libby on the benefits of yoga.

It must have been fate for me to be asked to review a beautiful children’s book about three years ago. Rachel’s Day in the Garden by Giselle Shardlow┬áis a book about Rachel and her dog, Sammy, and what they discover in the garden. Rachel practices yoga poses that emulate what they find…trees, bees, flowers, butterflies, sun, and caterpillars. Sammy happily romps along. The book is designed to be user friendly and accessible to anyone, not just yoga teachers.

One day, soon after becoming a Fundanoodle Ambassador, I decided to compare this book to our Muscle Mover Cards, which have a colorful animal and gross motor action word on one side and a traceable uppercase or lowercase letter on the other side. Much to my surprise and pleasure, I found six cards that correspond to animals and insects in the book and six additional cards that can be used as extended learning. Here is some of what I found.

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These Muscle Mover cards relate directly to pages in the book:

  • “Sammy jumped up and down, trying to catch a fluttering purple butterfly”, while Rachel practices Cobbler’s Pose.
  • “Rachel looked up, too. A red bird was settling into its nest.” Rachel is doing Warrior III Pose. (Fundanoodle’s bird is not red, but it only opens up conversation about similarities and differences.)
  • Sammy, just like Fundanoodle’s dog who digs, is doing all sorts of fun things through out the book.

So, I use Rachel’s Day in the Garden and Fundanoodle’s Muscle Mover Cards to teach the following concepts to little learners:

  1. Gross motor activity with a specific purpose.
  2. Basic yoga poses for strength, balance, and concentration.
  3. Letter recognition, sounds, and formation.
  4. Strengthening of hand and finger muscles using Play Doh and Wikki Stix to trace the letters. (The Muscle Mover cards come with a dry erase pen for use by learners who already know how to hold and use a writing implement.)
  5. Science discoveries like habitats, rainbows, the sun, the water cycle, photosynthesis, etc.
  6. Creative and critical thinking skills using comparison, cooperation, imagination, problem solving, etc.

This list could go on and on. The fun and learning definitely does.

One of the beauties of Yoga Play with Fundanoodle Libby is that it can be done anywhere…living room, studio, outside, even on line. Plans are in the works for a podcast. Stay tuned.

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Emma practice Warrior III like an Eagle.
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We make trees in Yoga Play!
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We creep like a caterpillar or inchworm in Yoga Play!
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We bloom like flowers in Yoga Play!

 

Be Careful Out There Yogis; Your Body Needs You

Be Careful Out There Yogis; Your Body Needs You…

As I picked up one of my favorite magazines and started to flip through it, I was so excited to see an eight page article about yoga. Wow! It had lots of information, beautiful graphics, and even a map showing all the yoga studios in the area. But as I read it, I became more and more disappointed.

This ‘beginner’s guide’, in my opinion, was actually quite intimidating in itself. The information was overwhelming. The graphics were gorgeous, yet not comprehensive. The map was helpful, yet furthered my concerns.

But enough about the article. I am really not here to criticize the magazine or the article’s author. It really was a nice article and any exposure yoga receives is good. And this magazine has always been one of my favorites and still is.

What I want to do, as a Certified Integrative Yoga Therapy Instructor, is take it back several steps and offer my own ideas about starting or continuing a yoga practice.

be careful

  1. Put safety first. Know your body and it’s limitations. Honor it. Practice the type of yoga that allows helpful and safe movement in your body, not the type that forces struggle and strain. One of the best ways to do this is to use props like blocks, bolsters, straps, blankets, and the wall. Use what you need to stay safe and feel good.
  2. Look for classes with descriptions using words like gentle, modified, slow, and well…beginners. Even if you are returning to yoga after a previous practice of intermediate, advanced, even power yoga, there is obviously a reason you took a break. Enter your new practice gradually and give yourself time to work back into it. And by all means, if you’ve never done yoga before, a gentle class suited for beginners is a must. And what’s even better is a Beginner’s Series, where you can learn the postures in detail.
  3. Do YOUR yoga. Even if you don’t know what that is yet, you do know your body, so honor it. All of your postures will look different from someone else’s and that is perfect. Your yoga. Your mat. Your choices.
  4. Try out a few different instructors and stick with the one who actually gives you instructions, cues, corrections, modifications, and positive feedback. Unfortunately, we are a dying breed. But we are out there and we want to help you.
  5. Breathe. Your body will thank you for it. It will actually move more easily and be open to new postures if you give it oxygen. Inhale deeply to open and lengthen the body. Exhale long and slow to settle into the posture. It will take a few reminders but practice will make it perfect.

be careful

I’ve been doing yoga for 13 years now and have been certified for almost two. I was lucky enough to learn from the very best instructors in this area. When people take my class for the first time, they say things like this:

  • no one ever told me I was doing that wrong
  • you are just what I was looking for
  • I’m so glad you give instructions and corrections
  • I’ve never been sure how to do many of the poses
  • your voice is soothing and makes me comfortable
  • it feels like coming home

This list isn’t for bragging. This list tells me that I’m doing what I was trained to do. Teach yoga in a safe, positive, and friendly environment. Allow my students to practice at a level and pace suited to their needs.

I teach yoga four times a week at three different locations to a variety of ages, genders, levels, physical abilities, and personalities. My job is to serve all of them, as best as I can.

So, I ask all yoga instructors and students…please be careful out there.

And call me if you need me.

Libby Blumberg, RYT 200

904-521-7097

libby@shantimomforone.com

be careful

be careful

be careful

 

More Yoga: It’s Unanimous

One of the goals I set for the new year (and beyond) is to do more yoga. It was nice to find out over the last few weeks that all three of my classes want to do more too! My Chair and Gentle Yoga classes all want me a second time each week. My community mamas want more yoga too. There is certainly enough time to do it and I am all for it. We shall see if schedules coordinate or collide.

Yoga has been a part of my life for about 12 years now. There’s one aspect of it that consistently makes it special: the people. I rarely do yoga on my own. I seem to need my people. And that becomes more and more true as I build clientele. Their feedback, conversations, willingness, and humor keeps me going and striving to be a better teacher.

A woman stopped me after my gentle yoga class the other day and said, “That was a great class. This is just what I was looking for.” Those words are gold to me. She was in search of something and it showed up. The Law of Attraction at its best.

A man in my chair yoga class asked for clarification about how to do a torso twist. I always emphasize that a twist starts at the waist, follows through with the ribs and chest, and finishes with the shoulders and head. He said, “That’s just like a golf swing.” What a perfect analogy. It was an AHA! moment for both of us.

My community mamas were coming to me once a month for Yoga Under the Palm Trees. We do yoga on my back patio surrounded by palm trees, our pool, and the sunny Florida sky. Before I even had a chance to ask if anybody wanted to do it twice a month, one of the moms, who had never done yoga before and has a really hard time relaxing, said, “Does anybody want to do this more often?” It was music to my ears. And now we do it twice a month.

more yoga