One Way to Approach the New Year

As this new year approached and I was inundated with suggestions to leave my troubles in 2017, look ahead to 2018, come up with a resolution for the new year, and be excited about it, all I could feel was the need to be left alone.

The last six months of 2017 were horrendous for my family. My 86-year-old father underwent heart surgery on August 1st and due to medical malpractice, suffered a brain injury. Before this, he was a healthy, strong, intelligent man who went to the gym three times a week, completed the New York Times Sunday Crossword Puzzle, and rode a tractor almost daily through acres of farm land. His heart is now as healthy as can be. His brain is not. Although he has progressed a great deal from being unable to walk, talk, eat, and control his bodily functions, our family has been through pure hell taking care of him. He and my mother now live with my family.

So, when faced with the anticipation of a new year, I simply felt stuck in the hardship of 2017. How can I not be? It’s still happening. So I wanted to put this off.  Could we just wait another six months for a new year? I’m just not ready.

So I turned to thoughts of yoga: love, light, peace, and truth in body, mind, and spirit. And that was my turning point.

New Years Day passed without a thought. I celebrated without the need to have discovered my resolution. Daily tasks were carried out in plenty of time. The house was transitioned back to normalcy from all the decorations, baked goods, and Christmas music.

What I had to remember is that this year has been difficult for me. And 2018 will continue to be the same, at least for the time being. In addition to the events surrounding my father’s injury, I have lived with anxiety and depression since the age of 19. I turned 50 last year. In fact, my 50th birthday celebration was brought to a screeching halt by what happened to my father. It’s been a struggle to keep my anxiety and depression at bay.

So I gave myself a break. A big one. I removed this huge need to identify what I desired for 2018 and gave myself the time and space to let it come to me. I created an opening to allow its entrance.

On January 1st, while scrolling through my Instagram feed, it flew right in. I saw a word I hadn’t seen in a while and had forgotten about: Sankalpa. This is a Sanskrit word in yogic philosophy that refers to a heartfelt desire. It is an intention or a resolve to do something. It comes from deep within and is often an affirmation.

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On January 2nd, I taught a yoga class using this idea as my theme, informing my students that they had one of four options:

1.) Use a resolution you’ve already created and transform it into a Sankalpa.

2.) Create your Sankalpa during class today.

3.) Be open to receive your Sankalpa if it is not easily coming to you.

4.) None of the above.

I had already chosen number three and I still haven’t been able to put it into a concise phrase, but I now know what I want this year. I want yoga. Not just the physical practice of yoga but all of the spiritual healing and connection that comes with it. I want to feel as much love and peace as possible every day, in every moment. I want to be able to surround the sadness I feel for my father with light and transform it into joy. I want to be true to myself and allow the time and space needed for all of this.

I can do it. I know I can. And I’m in no hurry.

 

Wonderful Places Where Yoga Heals

Project Balance

“Our Mission is to bring mind-body wellness to the children and families of our community through partnerships, education and outreach.”

Yoga 4 Change

“Yoga 4 Change is a non-profit organization that achieves meaningful change for veterans, incarcerated individuals, vulnerable youth, and those dealing with substance abuse. Our purpose-driven yoga program enables us to heal and empower these under-served populations, creating healthier, safer communities, one class at a time.”

The Recovery Village 

“Our patients reside in beautifully designed, private and semi-private rooms with comforting accommodations and amenities. We provide a rare retreat for our patients with a serene landscape and top-notch amenities to promote a healthy recovery environment.  Our full continuum of care reaches past your stay at our residential facility, ensuring continued success in your future.”

 

 

Learn Lessons of Love and Laughter in the Foreign Film, Heidi

Learn Lessons of Love and Laughter in the Foreign Film, Heidi…
Sweet, touching, and full of love, Heidi is a story of a little girl with a big spirit who overcomes the narrow minded attitudes of a few adults in her young life. She wins the heart of her grandfather and two friends from complete opposite class standings. Her smile never fades even through the darkest of times and always shows that kindness, laughter, and love will prevail.
learn lessons
Throughout the film, you are treated to the stunning countrysides and mountains of Germany and Switzerland. But it is through Heidi’s eyes and heart that we discover how her life is far more rich living in her grandfather’s primitive Alps cabin than it could ever be in the mansion of the governess.
Watch here as Heidi meets the governess, Miss Rottenmeier.
Heidi is available TODAY (4/4/17) as a DVD (exclusively at Walmart) or Digital.
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Heidi (Anuk Steffen) lernt Lesen in Frankfurt
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Klaras Großmutter (Hannelore Hoger) liest mit Heidi (Anuk Steffen) ein Buch

learn lessons

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More from Film Movement:
“An international box office smash, filmed on location in the Swiss Alps,
this Dove Foundation “Family Approved” live-action feature based on one of the best-selling children’s novels of all time, makes its U.S. debut on DVD and Digital April 4, 2017.
DVD AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT WALMART
 
With more than 50 million copies in print, Swiss author Johanna Spyri’s beloved 1880’s novel, “Heidi,” is one of the all-time classics of children’s literature, which has also spawned numerous adaptations – from a 1937 Shirley Temple vehicle and several Japanese anime series to a Hanna-Barbera feature.  This April, Omnibus Entertainment invites families everywhere to head for the hills with HEIDI, a new, lavishly produced adaptation starring Bruno Ganz and marking the big screen debut of Anuk Steffen as the titular Swiss mountain girl.
 
Orphan girl Heidi spends the happiest days of her childhood with her eccentric grandfather, Alpöhi (Ganz), cut off from the outside world in a simple cabin in the breathtaking Swiss mountains. Together with her friend Peter, she tends to grandfather’s goats and enjoys freedom in the mountains to the fullest.  But these carefree times come to an abrupt end when Heidi is whisked to Frankfurt by her Aunt Dete.  The idea is for her to stay with the wealthy Sesemann family and be a playmate for his wheelchair-bound daughter Klara, under the supervision of the strict nanny, Fräulein Rottenmeier.  Although the two girls soon become close friends and Klara’s grandmother awakes a passion for books in Heidi while teaching her to read and write, young Heidi‘s longing for her beloved mountains and her grandfather grows ever stronger.
 
Spyri originally published “Heidi” as a two-volume novel – “Heidi: Her Years of Wandering and Learning” and “Heidi: How She Used What She Learned” – and, according to the original subtitle, was written “for children and those who love children.”  Aside from being translated from the original German into over 50 different languages, HEIDI has also become an enduring figure in children’s entertainment through many theater productions; television programs, including one by the BBC and one by Walt Disney; films, including a silent one; a musical play co-written by Neil Simon; a video piece with Paul McCartney and Mike Kelley, and a talking dog version with Angela Lansbury.  There is even a “Heidiland” in eastern Switzerland.
 

Called “handsomely crafted” (Edmund Lee, South China Morning Post), this most recent adaptation, an international box office smash that has played at top children’s film festivals across the U.S., also captured the award for “Best Children’s Film” at last year’s German Film Awards.  Omnibus Entertainment’s DVD features both the original German language version with English subtitles, as well as a dubbed version.

 
HEIDI (111 minutes) Directed by Alain Gsponer. Starring Bruno Ganz, Anuk Steffen, Isabelle Ottman, Quirin Agrippi, Katharina Schuettler, Hannelore Hoger, Maxim Mehmet, Peter Lohmeyer, Anna Schinz, Jella Haasse.
An Omnibus Entertainment release, distributed by Film Movement.”